The 5 stages of die casting

Considering die casting? Heard plenty of recommendations about using the process for mass production of quality parts but not overly familiar with it yourself? Here at Lupton and Place, we’ve led the way for aluminium die casting for well over a century, and we’d like to think there’s not much …

Read moreThe 5 stages of die casting

Considering die casting? Heard plenty of recommendations about using the process for mass production of quality parts but not overly familiar with it yourself?

Here at Lupton and Place, we’ve led the way for aluminium die casting for well over a century, and we’d like to think there’s not much we don’t know about the process. Here we share a little of our expertise with you to explain how die casting works and why it is the favoured option amongst so many industries.

 

Die casting stages 

Die casting can be broken down into 5 clear stages:

  1. Clamping

This is the first step in the process. A die (the mould) is created in 2 halves, both of which are attached inside a die casting machine which then closes and securely clamps them together.

For every use these halves must be thoroughly cleaned to ensure there is no residue from the previous injection and then lubricated – although lubrication might not be needed every time.

 

  1. Injection

A furnace is used to maintain a set temperature for the molten metal. This hot thick liquid is then transferred into a chamber, and from here it is injected into the die.

The molten metal is inserted at a very high pressure as it is this force that holds the liquefied metal in place during solidification. Typical injection pressures range from 1,000 to 20,000 psi.

The amount of metal injected into the die is referred to as the ‘shot’ and the ‘injection time’ is how long it takes for the shot to fill all the channels and cavities. Typically, this all happens very quickly to prevent parts of the metal starting to solidify before others.

 

  1. Cooling

Once the whole cavity has been filled, the molten metal solidifies as it cools, and the final shape of the cast is formed.

 

  1. Ejection

After the allotted cooling time has passed, the die halves can be opened. The casting is then pushed out of the die cavity using an ejection mechanism. Once this has happened the die can be cleaned and closed again ready for the next injection.

 

  1. Trimming

During cooling, any excess or flash (a thin web or fin of metal which forms at die partings, vents or around moveable parts) needs to be trimmed. This can be done by either cutting, sawing or by using a trimming press.

And so the process continues, all at exceptional speed and with impressive reproduction quality for even the most intricate of parts.

 

Speak to the die casting experts

So now you know a little more about the process of die casting but if you would like more detailed information, or if you have further questions, why not speak to our team of experts here at Lupton and Place?

Having designed, developed and produced die castings for a wide range of industries, we are open to enquiries for all types of component manufacture – and we would welcome the opportunity to discuss how we could assist you with your next project.

Please fill in our enquiry form and we’ll get right back to you or alternatively give us a call on 01282 422361.